© Liverpool Geological Society
 Founded 1859
Registered Charity No: 500067

LIVERPOOL

GEOLOGICAL

SOCIETY

160th Session
All indoor meetings at 7.30pm in Lecture Theatre 137 of Liverpool John Moores University, Byrom Street L3 3AF unless otherwise stated. Campus map of LJMU - please click to get one you can read! The meeting is in the City Campus (1) The building map is here: Go in the main entrance - up to the first floor -  and all the way along the corridors towards the James Parsons Tower . At the end of the corridor is the Lecture Theatre.
Hon. Excursions Sec.: Maggie Williams email: williams.maggiee@gmail.com

Refreshments will be served

at the front of the lecture

theatre prior to the lecture.

Speakers’ Sec.: C. Hunt email: chris1972scfc@outlook.com

Oct 23

Prof Peter Burgess (Liverpool University)

It's all relative: the ups, downs, tilting and rebounds of

ancient sea level

Sea level is the elevation of the sea surface across the planet and changing sea level is one, but not the only, factor that controls how shorelines change and move through time. As we pass into a time when sea level is likely to change noticeably and perhaps dramatically on human timescales, understanding the geological history of changing sea level has never been more important. In this talk, we will discuss how we define and measure different aspects of sea level, and how sea level has changed through time. We will cover global changes produced by icecaps growing and shrinking, the the ever-shifting balance between deposition, erosion and sea level changes, and the tectonic bouncing up and down of shorelines and indeed entire continents as viscous mantle rock flows beneath them. Slower than a roller coaster, but in the end much more significant and perhaps a lot more scary, we need to understand the ups and downs of sea level because they may well turn out to determine the ups and downs of societies and perhaps even the human species.

Oct 30

Joint Meeting with the Herdman Geological Society in

                     the Herdman building - University of Liverpool

Rick Brassington (consultant)

Hydrogeology of Beer-

Admission by ticket  £3 (50)

Traditional beer is brewed from malted barley, hops, sugar, yeast and water – but not just any old water. Many breweries use groundwater and the type of beer produced, which ranges from traditional English ale to IPA, stout and lagers, depends largely on the groundwater chemistry. Groundwater is important partly because the ratio of beer produced to the water used ranges between six litres of water to as much as ten litres of water to produce one litre of beer. Water chemistry is a prime factor, and the brewing industry has long since settled on water from the Burton upon Trent area as being the best for the brewing process. The talk describes the brewing process from traditional breweries to the modern trend for microbreweries and then discusses the effects of different aspects of the water quality on the finished product.  The hydrogeology of two brewing areas are examined : Burton upon Trent and Tadcaster in North Yorkshire.

Nov 6

Prof Richard Holme (Liverpool)

Earth’s Magnetic Field Nov 20 Mike King (Bibby Hydromap)  Sea floor imaging Nov 27 Member’s Evening Hazel Clark - Iceland 2019 Maggie Williams - 3D visualisation Peter Williams - new maths content in A level Geology Dec 4 Geoff Gilchrist Quiz/cheese and wine Dec 11 Practical session - Dr Alan Boyle Igneous Rocks 2019 Jan 22 Distinguished visitor’s address Prof Andrew Chamberlain (Manchester) Caves Feb 5 Joint meeting NW Gp Geol Soc @ 7pm John Midgely BGS BGS Geoenergy project Feb 16 Herdman Symposium Feb 26 Dr Patrick Byrne (LJMU) Identification and quantification of the potential impacts of groundwater pollution at uranium mill sites in the USA. Mar 12 Dinner Mar 19 Tom Clifford (Atkins) Quarrying
© Liverpool Geological Society

Liverpool Geological

Society

160 th session
Registered Charity No: 500067

Oct 23

Prof Peter Burgess (Liverpool University)

It's all relative: the ups, downs, tilting and

rebounds of ancient sea level

Sea level is the elevation of the sea surface across the planet and changing sea level is one, but not the only, factor that controls how shorelines change and move through time. As we pass into a time when sea level is likely to change noticeably and perhaps dramatically on human timescales, understanding the geological history of changing sea level has never been more important. In this talk, we will discuss how we define and measure different aspects of sea level, and how sea level has changed through time. We will cover global changes produced by icecaps growing and shrinking, the the ever-shifting balance between deposition, erosion and sea level changes, and the tectonic bouncing up and down of shorelines and indeed entire continents as viscous mantle rock flows beneath them. Slower than a roller coaster, but in the end much more significant and perhaps a lot more scary, we need to understand the ups and downs of sea level because they may well turn out to determine the ups and downs of societies and perhaps even the human species.

Oct 30

Joint Meeting with the Herdman Geological

Society in the Herdman building Rick Brassington

(consultant)

Hydrogeology of Beer-

Admission by ticket  £3 (50)

Traditional beer is brewed from malted barley, hops, sugar, yeast and water – but not just any old water. Many breweries use groundwater and the type of beer produced, which ranges from traditional English ale to IPA, stout and lagers, depends largely on the groundwater chemistry.   Groundwater is important partly because the ratio of beer produced to the water used ranges between six litres of water to as much as ten litres of water to produce one litre of beer. Water chemistry is a prime factor, and the brewing industry has long since settled on water from the Burton upon Trent area as being the best for the brewing process.   The talk describes the brewing process from traditional breweries to the modern trend for microbreweries and then discusses the effects of different aspects of the water quality on the finished product.  The hydrogeology of two brewing areas are examined : Burton upon Trent and Tadcaster in North Yorkshire.

Nov 6

Prof Richard Holme (Liverpool)

Earth’s Magnetic Field Nov 20 Mike King (Bibby Hydromap)  Sea floor imaging Nov 27 Member’s Evening Hazel Clark - Iceland 2019 Maggie Williams - 3D visualisation Peter Williams - new maths content in A level Geology Dec 4 Geoff Gilchrist Quiz/cheese and wine Dec 11 Practical session - Dr Alan Boyle Igneous Rocks 2019 Jan 22 Distinguished visitor’s address Prof Andrew Chamberlain (Manchester) Caves Feb 5 Joint meeting NW Gp Geol Soc @ 7pm John Midgely BGS BGS Geoenergy project Feb 16 Herdman Symposium Feb 26 Dr Patrick Byrne (LJMU) Identification and quantification of the potential impacts of groundwater pollution at uranium mill sites in the USA. Mar 12 Dinner Mar 19 Tom Clifford (Atkins) Quarrying