© Liverpool Geological Society
 Founded 1859
Registered Charity No: 500067

LIVERPOOL

GEOLOGICAL

SOCIETY

159th Session
All indoor meetings at 7.30pm in Lecture Theatre 137 of Liverpool John Moores University, Byrom Street L3 3AF unless otherwise stated. Campus map of LJMU - please click to get one you can read! The meeting is in the City Campus (1) The building map is here: Go in the main entrance - up to the first floor -  and all the way along the corridors towards the James Parsons Tower . At the end of the corridor is the Lecture Theatre.
Hon. Excursions Sec.: Maggie Williams email: williams.maggiee@gmail.com

Refreshments will be served

at the front of the lecture

theatre prior to the lecture.

Speakers’ Sec.: C. Hunt email: chris1972scfc@outlook.com

November 21st

Tuesday 5th December 6.45 - 9.00 pm

Reefs and Rocks (sitting on the seafloor and coping

with environmental change).

A practical session with Jim Marshall and Maggie Williams

at the Central Teaching Laboratories

University of Liverpool

Reefs are, and have been, important marine ecosystems. They are sensitive to evolution and environmental change and build geologically important bodies of rock. We are familiar with modern shallow water reefs with wave-resistant structures that are dominated by corals and green algae.  In the past 'reef rocks' have, at times, been formed in different settings and by extinct groups of corals, sponge-like organisms, bivalves, microbes and mud. Reef deposits and the fossils in them come in many shapes and sizes. Reef-producing organisms cannot move but they can adapt to local events, from hurricanes to sea-level change. This session will start with a talk about reefs now and in the past. Participants will then have the chance to examine some beautiful specimens of Silurian fossils and rocks from Wenlock Edge in Shropshire and be able discover how the shape of the colonies changed in response to environmental pressures. We will conclude by examining seismic sections of  much younger reef reservoir rocks from the Far East that can be interpreted using the understanding that we have gained from our hand specimens.

Meet at the entrance to the CTL (by the green wall) at 6.45 -

prompt please . The session will be held in the 'Environment

Lab' on the first floor.

The Number of Participants will be limited

To book a place:  please email or phone Jim Marshall 

(isotopes@liv.ac.uk ; 0757 060 5659)

FIRST COME, FIRST SERVED.

December 12

Hazel Clark

Quiz – Cheese & Wine

The quiz will be in room G33.  We will need to sign in at the main desk in the James Parsons building. Hazel suggests that we meet outside Starbucks in the entrance hall at 6.45pm and all go together so we can make a start at 7pm

January 9

Dr Lis Rushworth

University of Liverpool

Early Man

January 23

Dr Tim Lane

Liverpool John Moores University

Greenlandic ice cap behaviour during the last millennium

February 6

Dr Pat Byrne

Liverpool John Moores University

River Pollution

February 17

Herdman Symposium

February 20

Prof Richard Chiverrell

University of Liverpool

Lake Sediments

March 6

Distinguished Visitor’s Address

Prof Derek Siveter

Oxford University

'Exceptional Cambrian  fossils, the flowering of early animal life, and world heritage in Yunnan'

March 13

Dinner

March 20

TBA

© Liverpool Geological Society

Liverpool Geological

Society

159 th session
Registered Charity No: 500067

Tuesday 5th December 6.45 - 9.00 pm

Reefs and Rocks (sitting on the seafloor and

coping with environmental change).

A practical session with Jim Marshall and Maggie

Williams

at the Central Teaching Laboratories

University of Liverpool

Reefs are, and have been, important marine ecosystems. They are sensitive to evolution and environmental change and build geologically important bodies of rock. We are familiar with modern shallow water reefs with wave- resistant structures that are dominated by corals and green algae.  In the past 'reef rocks' have, at times, been formed in different settings and by extinct groups of corals, sponge-like organisms, bivalves, microbes and mud. Reef deposits and the fossils in them come in many shapes and sizes. Reef-producing organisms cannot move but they can adapt to local events, from hurricanes to sea- level change. This session will start with a talk about reefs now and in the past. Participants will then have the chance to examine some beautiful specimens of Silurian fossils and rocks from Wenlock Edge in Shropshire and be able discover how the shape of the colonies changed in response to environmental pressures. We will conclude by examining seismic sections of  much younger reef reservoir rocks from the Far East that can be interpreted using the understanding that we have gained from our hand specimens.

Meet at the entrance to the CTL (by the green wall) at

6.45 - prompt please . The session will be held in the

'Environment Lab' on the first floor.

The Number of Participants will be limited

To book a place:  please email or phone Jim

Marshall  (isotopes@liv.ac.uk ; 0757 060 5659)

FIRST COME, FIRST SERVED.

December 12

Hazel Clark

Quiz – Cheese & Wine

The quiz will be in room G33.  We will need to sign in at the main desk in the James Parsons building. Hazel suggests that we meet outside Starbucks in the entrance hall at 6.45pm and all go together so we can make a start at 7pm

January 9

Dr Lis Rushworth

University of Liverpool

Early Man

January 23

Dr Tim Lane

Liverpool John Moores University

Greenlandic ice cap behaviour during the last millennium

February 6

Dr Pat Byrne

Liverpool John Moores University

River Pollution

February 17

Herdman Symposium

February 20

Prof Richard Chiverrell

University of Liverpool

Lake Sediments

March 6

Distinguished Visitor’s Address

Prof Derek Siveter

Oxford University

'Exceptional Cambrian  fossils, the flowering of early animal life, and world heritage in Yunnan'

March 13

Dinner

March 20

TBA