© Liverpool Geological Society
 Founded 1859
Registered Charity No: 500067

LIVERPOOL

GEOLOGICAL

SOCIETY

159th Session
All indoor meetings at 7.30pm in Lecture Theatre 137 of Liverpool John Moores University, Byrom Street L3 3AF unless otherwise stated. Campus map of LJMU - please click to get one you can read! The meeting is in the City Campus (1) The building map is here: Go in the main entrance - up to the first floor -  and all the way along the corridors towards the James Parsons Tower . At the end of the corridor is the Lecture Theatre.
Hon. Excursions Sec.: Maggie Williams email: williams.maggiee@gmail.com

Refreshments will be served

at the front of the lecture

theatre prior to the lecture.

Speakers’ Sec.: C. Hunt email: chris1972scfc@outlook.com

February 17

Herdman Symposium

February 20

This is a joint meeting with the North West Group of the Geological Society of London

Prof Richard Chiverrell

University of Liverpool

Learning lessons from Lake Sediments Lakes and their sediments provide a window on a range of environmental histories. Amongst the examples presented will be the first quantified lake sediment reconstruction of flood frequency and magnitude for the last 500 years for the British Isles. This record from Bassenthwaite Lake allows a more accurate estimation of the recurrence probability of rare floods and the magnitude of extreme flooding. We show for the current phase of devastating (1990-2016) flooding in the 350 km2 Derwent catchment (NW England) the 2009 event was the largest in >400 years and had an estimated recurrence interval far larger (1:9000 year) than revealed using short term gauged records (1:200 year). The 2009 and later 2015 (Storm Desmond) floods are part of a flood cluster (1990-2016) that is unprecedented since 1515 for this catchment. Other themes explored including using lakes to better understand histories of the fluxes of carbon, phosphorus and other nutrients from catchments to lake basins and the controls over these fluxes……  

March 6

Distinguished Visitor’s Address

Prof Derek Siveter

Oxford University

'Exceptional Cambrian  fossils, the flowering of early animal life, and world heritage in Yunnan' Among the hills and lakes of the Chengjiang area, Yunnan Province, South-West China, mudstones of Cambrian age (some 520 million years old} are yielding a spectacular variety of exquisitely preserved fossils.  Since the discovery of the first specimens in 1984, many thousands of fossils have been collected; they are represented by not just their hard shells, but also their soft tissues in fine detail. This remarkable preservation has produced fossils of outstanding scientific importance and rare beauty. The Cambrian Period (490-542 million years ago) witnessed the first appearance in the fossil record of nearly all the major animal groups that have sustained global biodiversity to the present day, these combined appearances comprising the so-called ‘Cambrian Explosion’ event.  The Chengjiang fossils are testimony to this event and study of them is contributing fundamentally to our understanding of the early evolution of animal life.  The global importance of the Chengjiang fossil sites was recognised in 2012, when they were awarded World Heritage status by UNESCO.

March 13

Dinner - menu here

March 20

Dr Steve Crowley

University of Liverpool

 Hematite mineralization of the East Irish Sea Basin Economic iron mineralization in the form of hematite ore deposits occurs at several sites located on the margins of the East Irish Sea basin. Ore fields centred on the Isle of Man and NE Wales consist of a few, modest, ore bodies, but the hematite ore deposits of west and south Cumbria, with a total ore production exceeding 200 million tonnes (~100 Mt Fe), represented an iron resource of international importance during the 19th and 20th centuries. The geological origins of the Cumbrian ore deposits have long been the subject of controversy with a written record stretching back over 180 years. In 1977 the British Geological Survey (BGS) published a speculative genetic ore deposit model that attempted to account for the source, transport and precipitation of iron in the south Cumbria ore district and, by implication, the wider Cumbrian hematite ore field (and beyond). While key components of this model possess an air of credibility, no substantive theoretical or empirical evidence was presented to support the apparently complex set of geological, geochemical and hydrogeological processes required to account for observed mineralization. This lecture examines the veracity of the BGS model by subjecting components of the model to critical scrutiny and, where possible, exposing them to quantitative tests using simple geological principles. The outcome of this assessment leads to some perhaps surprising conclusions regarding the possible origin of these ore deposits.
© Liverpool Geological Society

Liverpool Geological

Society

159 th session
Registered Charity No: 500067

February 17

Herdman Symposium

February 20

This is a joint meeting with the North West Group of the Geological Society of London

Prof Richard Chiverrell

University of Liverpool

Learning lessons from Lake Sediments Lakes and their sediments provide a window on a range of environmental histories. Amongst the examples presented will be the first quantified lake sediment reconstruction of flood frequency and magnitude for the last 500 years for the British Isles. This record from Bassenthwaite Lake allows a more accurate estimation of the recurrence probability of rare floods and the magnitude of extreme flooding. We show for the current phase of devastating (1990-2016) flooding in the 350 km2 Derwent catchment (NW England) the 2009 event was the largest in >400 years and had an estimated recurrence interval far larger (1:9000 year) than revealed using short term gauged records (1:200 year). The 2009 and later 2015 (Storm Desmond) floods are part of a flood cluster (1990-2016) that is unprecedented since 1515 for this catchment. Other themes explored including using lakes to better understand histories of the fluxes of carbon, phosphorus and other nutrients from catchments to lake basins and the controls over these fluxes……  

March 6

Distinguished Visitor’s Address

Prof Derek Siveter

Oxford University

'Exceptional Cambrian  fossils, the flowering of early animal life, and world heritage in Yunnan' Among the hills and lakes of the Chengjiang area, Yunnan Province, South-West China, mudstones of Cambrian age (some 520 million years old} are yielding a spectacular variety of exquisitely preserved fossils.  Since the discovery of the first specimens in 1984, many thousands of fossils have been collected; they are represented by not just their hard shells, but also their soft tissues in fine detail. This remarkable preservation has produced fossils of outstanding scientific importance and rare beauty. The Cambrian Period (490-542 million years ago) witnessed the first appearance in the fossil record of nearly all the major animal groups that have sustained global biodiversity to the present day, these combined appearances comprising the so-called ‘Cambrian Explosion’ event.  The Chengjiang fossils are testimony to this event and study of them is contributing fundamentally to our understanding of the early evolution of animal life.  The global importance of the Chengjiang fossil sites was recognised in 2012, when they were awarded World Heritage status by UNESCO.

March 13

Dinner

March 20

Dr Steve Crowley

University of Liverpool

 Hematite mineralization of the East Irish Sea Basin Economic iron mineralization in the form of hematite ore deposits occurs at several sites located on the margins of the East Irish Sea basin. Ore fields centred on the Isle of Man and NE Wales consist of a few, modest, ore bodies, but the hematite ore deposits of west and south Cumbria, with a total ore production exceeding 200 million tonnes (~100 Mt Fe), represented an iron resource of international importance during the 19th and 20th centuries. The geological origins of the Cumbrian ore deposits have long been the subject of controversy with a written record stretching back over 180 years. In 1977 the British Geological Survey (BGS) published a speculative genetic ore deposit model that attempted to account for the source, transport and precipitation of iron in the south Cumbria ore district and, by implication, the wider Cumbrian hematite ore field (and beyond). While key components of this model possess an air of credibility, no substantive theoretical or empirical evidence was presented to support the apparently complex set of geological, geochemical and hydrogeological processes required to account for observed mineralization. This lecture examines the veracity of the BGS model by subjecting components of the model to critical scrutiny and, where possible, exposing them to quantitative tests using simple geological principles. The outcome of this assessment leads to some perhaps surprising conclusions regarding the possible origin of these ore deposits.