© Liverpool Geological Society
 Founded 1859
Registered Charity No: 500067

LIVERPOOL

GEOLOGICAL

SOCIETY

159th Session
Fragment from the Chelyabinsk meteorite  Photo © Peter Williams 

NEWS

.
 2018 is the pilot year for this nationwide initiative which seeks to introduce as many members of the public to geoscience as possible, mainly through outdoor activities such as urban, rural or coastal fieldwork. If you visit the Earth Science Education Forum (ESEF) website, you can see that similar initiatives elsewhere have been very successful. For example: On a single day in May 2015 nearly 10,000 members of the public experienced 50+ geological field trips led by 500+ geoscientists across Spain Canadian regions devised geoscience posters in collaboration with schools across the country On Geoheritage Day in Ottawa, small groups of geoscientists stationed at sites of geoscientific interest successfully engaged the public across the city. [See: http://www.bgs.ac.uk/esef/mobGeosci.htm ]  At the LGS Council Meeting on 16/01/2018, it was decided that during the nine-day 'week' (GeoWeek), Liverpool Geological Society would aim to offer an urban field visit on Saturday 12th May 2018.  This urban field visit will be based on the LGS leaflet ‘Rock Around William Brown Street’. If you would like to be involved in the planning for this event &/or could offer a couple of hours on 12th May to share your enthusiasm and help members of the public to find out more about the building stones in William Brown Street – and the stories told by the rocks, fossils and minerals they can see there, please contact Maggie Williams via williams.maggiee@gmail.com
Thursday 19th April 2018 PESGB Liverpool Branch Meeting in the Jane Herdman Lecture Theatre, Jane Herdman Building, 4, Brownlow Street, Liverpool, L69 3GP.  LGS members are welcome to attend this meeting which starts at 7.00pm.  Tea/ coffee will be available before the start of the meeting.         Prof Jonathan Redfern, North Africa Research Group, University of Manchester ‘Chasing the Triassic Continental Sandstone Play Fairway across NW Africa:  Characteristics, Challenges and Opportunities’ During the breakup of Pangea, Triassic rift basins developed across North Africa, filled by thick sequences of continental red beds.  These sequences comprise ephemeral and perennial fluvial sandstones, aeolian sandstones, alluvial fan conglomerates, playa, floodplain and lacustrine mudrocks.  Toward the end of the Triassic many basins experience a transgression with deposition of marine limestones and mudstones, and where the palaeogeography and climatic conditions were conducive, thick sequences of evaporites were deposited that act as a regional super-seal.   This interval forms an important reservoir across North Africa, with over a billion barrels discovered in Algeria, Libya and Tunisia. The Triassic system is now being actively explored in Morocco, with the recent Tendrara wells drilled by Sound Energy testing gas from Triassic sandstones, extending this play fairway to the west.   There are many other Triassic rifts along NW African margin where a similar play exists, some undrilled, whose prospectivity is unknown The talk will review our understanding of the controls and characteristics of the main depositional systems, reservoir distribution and quality, source and seal and implications for the petroleum system. We will discuss challenges for exploration and development and the opportunities for this play along the NW Africa margin.
© Liverpool Geological Society

Liverpool Geological

Society

159 th session
Registered Charity No: 500067

NEWS

.
 2018 is the pilot year for this nationwide initiative which seeks to introduce as many members of the public to geoscience as possible, mainly through outdoor activities such as urban, rural or coastal fieldwork. If you visit the Earth Science Education Forum (ESEF) website, you can see that similar initiatives elsewhere have been very successful. For example: On a single day in May 2015 nearly 10,000 members of the public experienced 50+ geological field trips led by 500+ geoscientists across Spain Canadian regions devised geoscience posters in collaboration with schools across the country On Geoheritage Day in Ottawa, small groups of geoscientists stationed at sites of geoscientific interest successfully engaged the public across the city. [See: http://www.bgs.ac.uk/esef/mobGeosci.htm ]  At the LGS Council Meeting on 16/01/2018, it was decided that during the nine-day 'week' (GeoWeek), Liverpool Geological Society would aim to offer an urban field visit on Saturday 12th May 2018.  This urban field visit will be based on the LGS leaflet ‘Rock Around William Brown Street’. If you would like to be involved in the planning for this event &/or could offer a couple of hours on 12th May to share your enthusiasm and help members of the public to find out more about the building stones in William Brown Street – and the stories told by the rocks, fossils and minerals they can see there, please contact Maggie Williams via williams.maggiee@gmail.com
Thursday 19th April 2018 PESGB Liverpool Branch Meeting in the Jane Herdman Lecture Theatre, Jane Herdman Building, 4, Brownlow Street, Liverpool, L69 3GP.  LGS members are welcome to attend this meeting which starts at 7.00pm.  Tea/ coffee will be available before the start of the meeting.         Prof Jonathan Redfern, North Africa Research Group, University of Manchester ‘Chasing the Triassic Continental Sandstone Play Fairway across NW Africa:  Characteristics, Challenges and Opportunities’ During the breakup of Pangea, Triassic rift basins developed across North Africa, filled by thick sequences of continental red beds.  These sequences comprise ephemeral and perennial fluvial sandstones, aeolian sandstones, alluvial fan conglomerates, playa, floodplain and lacustrine mudrocks.  Toward the end of the Triassic many basins experience a transgression with deposition of marine limestones and mudstones, and where the palaeogeography and climatic conditions were conducive, thick sequences of evaporites were deposited that act as a regional super-seal.   This interval forms an important reservoir across North Africa, with over a billion barrels discovered in Algeria, Libya and Tunisia. The Triassic system is now being actively explored in Morocco, with the recent Tendrara wells drilled by Sound Energy testing gas from Triassic sandstones, extending this play fairway to the west.   There are many other Triassic rifts along NW African margin where a similar play exists, some undrilled, whose prospectivity is unknown The talk will review our understanding of the controls and characteristics of the main depositional systems, reservoir distribution and quality, source and seal and implications for the petroleum system. We will discuss challenges for exploration and development and the opportunities for this play along the NW Africa margin.